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Pakistan has accepted that it will be difficult for it to find support if it rakes up Kashmir in front of the five permanent members (P5) of the United Nations Security Council, or even before a section of Muslim countries.
Pakistan has accepted that it will be difficult for it to find support if it rakes up Kashmir in front of the five permanent members (P5) of the United Nations Security Council, or even before a section of Muslim countries.
Pakistani foreign minister SM Qureshi said at a press conference on Monday: "People in the Security Council aren't standing with flowers; any of the P5 members can be a hurdle. There shouldn't be any ambiguity on that, do not live in a fool's paradise."
 
The P5 are China, France, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States.
 
He added: "Let the people of Pakistan and Kashmir be aware that nobody out there [at UNSC] is waiting for you, nor awaiting your invite."
 
The development comes exactly a week after New Delhi decided to remove Jammu and Kashmir's special status.
 
Over the weekend, Russia became the first P5 country to openly back New Delhi's decision on Kashmir, calling it India's internal matter taken "within the framework of the Constitution of the Republic of India".
 
The US state department has also "noted" that India declared the issue an internal matter.
 
Last week, in a big snub to Pakistan, UNSC did not take up Qureshi's letter of August 6 at several meetings written in the aftermath of New Delhi removing the special status for the erstwhile state of Jammu and Kashmir.
 
Referring to India, the Pakistani foreign minister also said, "Lots of countries have interests there. I have said this in hints earlier, hope you get it. It's a realignment. It's a market of one billion people, lots of people have invested there."
 
"We talk about Ummah [global Muslim community]and Islam but those who are the safeguards of Muslim nations have invested there [in India]. They have their interests there."
 
Qureshi's statement comes on a day when Saudi Arabia-backed Saudi Aramco, the world's largest company by revenue, announced it will acquire a 20% stake in Reliance's oil-to-chemical business, making it India's largest foreign direct investment.
 
In the last one week, two members of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) — United Arab Emirates and Maldives — have supported New Delhi's decision on Kashmir, calling it an internal matter.
 
UAE's envoy to India Dr Ahmad Al Banna has said, "We expect that the changes would improve social justice and security and confidence of the people in the local governance." Maldives said, "We believe that it is the right of every sovereign nation to amend their laws as required."